What does Shibari mean?

Is Shibari the same as Kinbaku?

Shibari (縛 り) literally means tying, while Kinbaku (緊 縛) can be translated as tying strongly. Both words are used interchangeably to refer to the Japanese discipline of the erotic way of tying, whose origin is recent (first half of the 20th century), despite finding its inspiration in the martial art of Hojōjutsu (捕 縄 術), which taught the use of ropes to tie prisoners in their transport or punishment, and dating from the Japanese Edo period (XVII-XIX centuries).
Shibari is not about making shapes and figures, but about the way in which the rope is used as a communication, transforming into a living extension of the artist's hands. Perhaps it is because of this that the well-known photographer Araki Nobuyoshi makes reference to the experience of Shibari defining it as a strong hug.

Why do we do Shibari?

From the helplessness that results from giving control completely to another person, to the deep confidence that this gesture reflects between model and rigger, the effects of this discipline are very intense. The relaxation and absolute calm that follows to the exercise of mental control over sensations such as fear or pain because of the extreme contortion of the body. Shibari can also be used as an aesthetic confluence, since its artistic value allows it to become an easy discipline to interrelate with others. Numerous artists use the expressiveness of the ropes to create performances of all kinds, not necessarily with Shibari itself as the central focus. The wide physical possibilities of Shibari allows us to create situations of emotional power, taking advantage of the tension or distension of the bodies, the erotic exposed or covered, the fascination against ingravity, the loss of the notion of time and space, the tenderness of a rope's caress in front of the threatening touching, etc.
Shibari can offer a constructive experience in many ways, and can be used as a tool to improve couple dynamics, enhancing emotional exchange and trust in both sides of the ropes. It teaches us a body and mental language that can help us develop our ability to take responsibility, and to work self-esteem, creativity and relaxation, in addition to offering us a unique method of play with infinite possibilities.

You can read more about shibari as well as two interviews with models in this article written by Zor Neurobashing for DuckOut! Magazine.

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